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Location:
Houston, Texas, United States
Posted:
October 06, 2016

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Withdrawal Application

Complete, sign and return to: Benefits Administration, GuideStone Financial Resources, 2401 Cedar Springs Road, Dallas, TX 75201-1498. If you would like to request a direct rollover, please call GuideStone at 1-888-98-GUIDE (1-888-***-****) between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. CST, Monday through Friday.

1. PARTICIPANT INFORMATION

Participant name: Social Security number (last four digits): Home address:

City: State: ZIP Code: Home telephone: Daytime telephone: Email: Birth date: / / Marital Status: Married Single 2. WITHDRAWAL INFORMATION

A. Type of withdrawal:

Termination withdrawal

Date employment ended or will end with employer of this plan: / / In-service withdrawal

Hardship withdrawal (Please enclose Certification of Financial Need form.) Alternate payee withdrawal (as a result of a qualified domestic relations order) Name of original participant:

B. I elect the following:

Distribute $ or % of my total eligible, vested account payable to me. (This amount may be subject to distribution restrictions imposed by law. In some cases, your employer’s plan may provide that certain contributions are not eligible for distribution until you reach early retirement or retirement age. This option may create adverse tax consequences and may be subject to a mandatory 20% federal income tax withholding. If you would like to roll this amount over, please call GuideStone to request the appropriate form.) C. I want all of my 403(b) and/or 401(k) retirement plan(s)/fund(s) to apply to this withdrawal unless I elect a specific 403(b) and/or 401(k) plan in this section (does not apply to other plan types, such as 457(b) or 409A plans). Use only the following plan(s)/fund(s): Do not include Roth elective deferrals and earnings. D. (Optional) If your account includes a loan:

I authorize GuideStone to pay off my outstanding loan balance by reducing my account balance by my loan payoff amount plus 20% for federal income tax withholding. I realize that this total will be taxable to me. E. If your account includes Roth or tax-paid contributions, do you have Roth or tax-paid contributions through this employer with another recordkeeper other than GuideStone?

Yes No

3. FEDERAL INCOME TAX WITHHOLDING

A. Your payment is considered an eligible rollover distribution and is subject to a mandatory 20% federal income tax withholding (unless this is a hardship withdrawal). Choose one: Mandatory 20% only Mandatory 20% plus an additional % or $ B. If this is a hardship withdrawal, voluntary withholding rules apply. Choose one: No, do not withhold federal income tax. Yes, withhold % or $ .

© 2015 GuideStone Financial Resources 26035 04/15 1489

*1489*

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4. STATE INCOME TAX WITHHOLDING

If any part of your payment is exempt from state income tax withholding or your state does not require withholding, we will not withhold tax. If you wish to designate a state as your state of residence for tax purposes other than your address on record at GuideStone, please designate the state. Additional information can be obtained by contacting your state’s revenue department. State of residence for tax purposes: My state does not have income tax.

No, do not withhold state income tax from the taxable portion of my payment(s) unless required by state income tax laws. Withhold state income tax according to the following: Single Married Married, but withhold at higher single rate Enter number of allowances:

Optional: Withhold an additional % or $ from my payments for state income tax withholding. 5. DIRECT DEPOSIT

Complete this section to have your check electronically deposited. Include a voided check or deposit slip. If you do not complete this section, a check will be mailed to you.

Bank name: Bank phone: Type of account (check one): Checking account (voided check only) Savings account (voided deposit slip) Routing number: Account number: 6. SPOUSAL CONSENT (IF SPOUSAL CONSENT IS REQUIRED, YOUR APPLICATION WILL NOT BE PROCESSED UNTIL THIS SECTION IS COMPLETED.) I, the spouse of the named participant, consent to the distribution requested by the participant. I acknowledge that my consent continues to apply to the election made on this application in the event the amount associated with this distribution election is later reduced prior to the effective distribution of the amount.

Spouse signature: Notary seal: Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of (month), (year). Notary Public signature: State: My commission expires: / / 7. PARTICIPANT SIGNATURE

I affirm that, if applicable, I have discussed any withdrawal requests with my spouse prior to submission. I certify that I have received and carefully read the enclosed Special Tax Notice regarding plan payments. I authorize payment in the manner indicated on this form. If the requested payment would result in a remaining balance of $1,000 or less, I authorize GuideStone to distribute the remaining balance unless prohibited by law. I certify that I am not requesting a withdrawal of funds that were transferred to GuideStone from another plan unless I have had a severance of employment with that employer. I understand that I may defer receiving a distribution until a future date, and I can invest any amount I keep in the plan in the same investment funds as any active employee even if I am no longer an active employee. There are no additional fees if I postpone receiving distributions from the plan. At the time I want to receive a distribution, I may choose the form of payment by submitting the appropriate form. I understand payments must begin by April 1 following the calendar year in which I reach age 70 or, if later, the calendar year in which I retire. GuideStone reserves the right to correct any errors. Participant signature: Date: / /

(cannot be signed more than 180 days prior to withdrawal) 8. EMPLOYER VERIFICATION

Must be completed by employer unless the employer has already notified GuideStone of your termination date or if you are an alternate payee due to a qualified domestic relations order. Please call GuideStone if you are unsure if this is necessary. Type of withdrawal:

In service: How many in-service distributions through all vendors has employee received in current plan year? Severance from employment: Date of severance: / / Vested percentage of employer contributions: % based on years of service Hardship

Qualified reservist distribution (Distribution is available to a reservist ordered or called to active duty for 180 or more days.) HEART act distribution (If distribution is due to deemed severance, participant cannot defer contributions to plan for six months.) Employer name: Date: / / Signature of authorized officer: Consider the following:

Did you know your account balance can remain right where it is with GuideStone? You will have the same professional management and the same toll-free and online access you currently enjoy. If you would like to continue building a stronger financial base for retirement, consider establishing a RightChoice IRATM where you have access to GuideStone Funds’ Christian-based, socially screened, mutual funds.

Are you ready to retire? Consider talking to GuideStone about establishing retirement income through one of the many options available.

Be careful about taking a lump-sum withdrawal from your retirement account. Taxes and penalties may apply and can deplete your account quickly. If you need emergency money, a loan from your retirement account may be a better option. You may be eligible to borrow up to half your account value

(maximum is $50,000) and repay it from one to five years. Call or log into MyGuideStoneTM to learn more.

If you are a minister:

GuideStone offers eligible, retired ministers the opportunity to designate retirement income as a tax- free housing allowance. Amounts designated must comply with IRS limits and be substantiated by the minister. Also, ministers do not pay SECA taxes on salary-reduced contributions to their GuideStone plan assuming these contributions are within IRS limits on 403(b) retirement plans. These two tax advantages may not be available through other providers. GuideStone has a rich history of serving our participants’ financial needs. We’ve been enhancing the financial security of our participants since 1918. That’s more than 95 years of trusted service. If you have questions or need additional assistance, you may reach a customer relations specialist by calling 1-888-98-GUIDE (1-888-***-****).

You should carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of GuideStone Funds before investing. For a copy of the prospectus with this and other information about the funds, please call 1-888-98-GUIDE (1-888-***-****) or visit www.GuideStoneFunds.org to view or download a prospectus. You should read the prospectus carefully before investing. GuideStone Funds shares are distributed by Foreside Funds Distributors LLC, not an adviser affiliate.

IRAs made available through GuideStone Financial Services, member FINRA Wondering what to do with your

retirement account?

Choose wisely and know all of your options.

© 2014 GuideStone Financial Resources 23358 02/14 1388 Special Tax Notice

(This notice is required by the Internal Revenue Service.) YOUR ROLLOVER OPTIONS

You are receiving this notice because all or a portion of a payment you are receiving from your employer’s sponsored retirement plan (the Plan), serviced by GuideStone Financial Resources (GuideStone), is eligible to be rolled over to an IRA, Roth IRA or an employer plan. This notice is intended to help you decide whether to do such a rollover or not. This notice describes the rollover rules that apply to payments from the Plan that are from a designated Roth account and also payments from the Plan that are not from a designated Roth account. Refer to your distribution check from GuideStone, or look online at your MyGuideStone account or call 1-888-98-GUIDE (1-888-***-****) to find details about any payment you receive from GuideStone, including what portion of the distribution is being paid from a designated Roth account, if any. Rules that apply to most payments from a plan, including payments from a designated Roth account, are described in the

“General Information About Rollovers” section. Special rules that only apply in certain circumstances are described in the

“Special Rules and Options” section.

30-Day Notice Period/Waiver. After receiving this notice, you have at least 30 days to consider whether to receive your distribution or have the distribution directly rolled over. If you do not wish to wait until this 30-day notice period ends before your election is processed, you may waive the notice period by making an affirmative election indicating whether or not you wish to make a direct rollover. Your distribution then will be processed in accordance with your election as soon as practical after the plan administrator receives your election. DEFERRING DISTRIBUTIONS

If you are under age 70 or if you have not yet retired, you may want to postpone beginning to receive distributions from the Plan. Any distribution that you take now will, of course, reduce the retirement resources available to you under the Plan in later years.

Consequences of failing to defer your distribution Your decision whether to take your distribution now or to defer receipt of your distribution has tax implications for you.

• Loss of pretax growth. If you take the distribution now (and do not roll over the distribution):

(1) You must include the distribution in your gross income for the year of the distribution, except to the extent you have “basis” (after-tax dollars) in your account.

(2) You lose the opportunity to defer taxation on any earnings on your account balance and to earn additional pretax earnings on the earnings themselves (referred to as compounding of pretax earnings). The longer you delay the distribution, the longer the period you have to accumulate more earnings in your account.

• Potential 10% additional tax. If you currently are under age 59 and you receive your distribution, the taxable portion of the distribution will be subject to a 10% penalty tax in addition to any federal income tax, unless an exception applies. Deferring the distribution until you attain age 59 avoids this 10% penalty. See information in this notice for a further explanation of the tax consequences of your distribution alternatives.

• Rollover benefits. If you roll over the distribution (either by a direct rollover or by receiving the distribution and rolling over the distribution within 60 days of receipt), you can continue to receive the benefits of retire- ment plan growth as is more fully explained in this notice.

• Potential investments and fees. Some investment choices under the Plan may not be generally available on similar terms outside the Plan. Fees and expenses (including administrative or investment-related fees) outside the Plan may be different from fees and expenses that apply to your Plan account. Please contact GuideStone at 1-888-98-GUIDE (1-888-***-****) to obtain additional information on:

(1) The general availability outside the Plan of the Plan’s currently available investment options.

(2) The fees and expenses which apply to your account. Continued on next page »

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ROLLOVERS

How can a rollover affect my taxes?

The rules on where you can roll over a payment depend on the type of account from which you receive a distribution. The portion of your payment that is not from a designated Roth account is treated differently from any portion of your payment that is from a designated Roth account. If your distribution includes payments from both types of accounts, there are two different sets of rollover rules that apply to that distribution.

• If payment is not from a designated Roth account: You will be taxed on a payment from the Plan if you do not roll it over. If you are under age 59 and do not do a rollover, you will also have to pay a 10% additional income tax on early distributions (unless an exception applies). However, if you do a rollover, you will not have to pay tax until you receive payments later, and the 10% additional income tax will not apply if those payments are made after you are age 59 (or if an exception applies).

• If payment is from a designated Roth account:

After-tax contributions included in a payment from a designated Roth account are not taxed, but earnings might be taxed. The tax treatment of earnings included in the payment depends on whether the payment is a

“qualified distribution.” If a payment is only part of your designated Roth account, the payment will include an allocable portion of the earnings in your designated Roth account. If the payment from the Plan is not a qualified distribution and you do not do a rollover to a Roth IRA or a designated Roth account in an employer plan, you will be taxed on the earnings in the payment. If you are under age 59, a 10% additional income tax on early distributions will also apply to the earnings (unless an exception applies). However, if you do a rollover, you will not have to pay taxes currently on the earnings and you will not have to pay taxes later on payments that are qualified distributions. If the payment from the Plan is a qualified distribution, you will not be taxed on any part of the payment, even if you do not do a rollover. If you do a rollover, you will not be taxed on the amount you roll over, and any earnings on the amount you roll over will not be taxed if paid later in a qualified distribution. A qualified distribution from a designated Roth account in the Plan is a payment made after you are age 59

(or after your death or disability) and after you have had a designated Roth account in the Plan for at least five years. In applying the five-year rule, you count from January 1 of the year your first contribution was made to the designated Roth account. However, if you did a direct rollover to a designated Roth account in the Plan from a designated Roth account in another employer plan, your participation will count from January 1 of the year your first contribution was made to the designated Roth account in the Plan or, if earlier, to the designated Roth account in the other employer plan.

Where may I roll over the payment?

The rules on where you can roll over a payment depend on the type of account from which you receive a distribution. The portion of your payment that is not from a designated Roth account is treated differently from any portion of your payment that is from a designated Roth account. If your distribution includes payments from both types of accounts, there are two different sets of rollover rules that apply to that distribution.

• If payment is not from a designated Roth account: The portion of your payment that is not from a designated Roth account may be rolled over to either an IRA

(an Individual Retirement Account or individual retirement annuity) or an employer plan (a tax-qualified plan, section 403(b) plan or governmental section 457(b) plan) that will accept the rollover. The rules of the IRA or employer plan that holds the rollover will determine your investment options, fees and rights to payment from the IRA or employer plan (for example, no spousal consent rules apply to IRAs and IRAs may not provide loans). Further, the amount rolled over will become subject to the tax rules that apply to the IRA or employer plan.

• If payment is from a designated Roth account:

The portion of your payment that is from a designated Roth account may be rolled over to either a Roth IRA (a Roth Individual Retirement Account or Roth individual retirement annuity) or a designated Roth account in an employer plan (a tax-qualified plan or section 403(b) plan) that will accept the rollover. The rules of the Roth IRA or employer plan that holds the rollover will determine your investment options, fees and rights to payment from the Roth IRA or employer plan (for example, no spousal consent rules apply to Roth IRAs and Roth IRAs may not provide loans). Further, the amount rolled over will become subject to the tax rules that apply to the Roth IRA or the designated Roth account in the employer plan. In general, these tax rules are similar to those described elsewhere in this notice, but differences include:

» If you do a rollover to a Roth IRA, all of your Roth IRAs will be considered for purposes of determining whether you have satisfied the five-year rule (counting from January 1 of the year for which your first 2

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contribution was made to any of your Roth IRAs).

» If you do a rollover to a Roth IRA, you will not be required to take a distribution from the Roth IRA during your lifetime, but you must keep track of the aggregate amount of the after-tax contributions in all of your Roth IRAs (in order to determine your taxable income for later Roth IRA payments that are not qualified distributions).

» Eligible rollover distributions from a Roth IRA can only be rolled over to another Roth IRA. How do I do a rollover?

The rules on how to do a rollover depend on the type of account from which you receive a distribution. If your distribu- tion includes payments from both a designated Roth account and from a non-Roth account, there are two different sets of rollover rules that apply to that distribution.

• If payment is not from a designated Roth account: There are two ways to do a rollover of the portion of your payment that is not from a designated Roth account. You can do either a direct rollover or a 60-day rollover. If you do a direct rollover, the Plan will make the payment directly to your IRA or an employer plan. You should contact the IRA sponsor or the administrator of the employer plan for information on how to do a direct rollover.

If you do not do a direct rollover, you may still do a rollover by making a deposit into an IRA or eligible employer plan that will accept it. You will have 60 days after you receive the payment to make the deposit. If you do not do a direct rollover, the Plan is required to withhold 20% of the payment for federal income taxes. This means that, in order to roll over the entire payment in a 60-day rollover, you must use other funds to make up for the 20% withheld. If you do not roll over the entire amount of the payment, the portion not rolled over will be taxed and will be subject to the 10% additional income tax on early distributions if you are under age 59 (unless an exception applies).

• If payment is from a designated Roth account:

There are also two ways to do a rollover of the portion of your payment that is from a designated Roth account. You can either do a direct rollover or a 60-day rollover. If you do a direct rollover, the Plan will make the payment directly to your Roth IRA or designated Roth account in an employer plan. You should contact the Roth IRA sponsor or the administrator of the employer plan for information on how to do a direct rollover. If you do not do a direct rollover, you may still do a rollover by making a deposit within 60 days into a Roth IRA, whether the payment is a qualified or nonqualified distribution. In addition, you can do a rollover by mak- ing a deposit within 60 days into a designated Roth account in an employer plan, if the payment is a nonquali- fied distribution and the rollover does not exceed the amount of the earnings in the payment. You cannot do a 60-day rollover to an employer plan of any part of a qualified distribution. If you receive a distribution that is a nonqualified distribution and you do not roll over an amount at least equal to the earnings allocable to the distribution, you will be taxed on the amount of those earnings not rolled over, including the 10% additional income tax on early distributions if you are under age 59 (unless an exception applies). If you do a direct rollover of only a portion of the amount paid from the Plan and a portion is paid to you, each of the payments will include an allocable portion of the earnings in your designated Roth account. If you do not do a direct rollover and the payment is not a qualified distribution, the Plan is required to with- hold 20% of the earnings for federal income taxes. This means that, in order to roll over the entire payment in a 60-day rollover to a Roth IRA, you must use other funds to make up for the 20% withheld. How much may I roll over?

The rules on how much you may roll over are the same for your entire distribution, whether or not it includes amounts from a designated Roth account. If you wish to do a rollover, you may roll over all or part of the amount eligible for rollover. Any payment from the Plan is eligible for rollover, except:

• Certain payments spread over a period of at least 10 years or over your life or life expectancy (or the lives or joint life expectancy of you and your beneficiary)

• Required minimum distributions after age 70 (or after death)

• Hardship distributions

• ESOP dividends

Continued on next page »

• Corrective distributions of contributions that exceed tax law limitations

• Loans treated as deemed distributions (for example, loans in default due to missed payments before your employment ends)

• Payments of certain automatic enrollment contributions requested to be withdrawn within 90 days of the first contribution

• Amounts treated as distributed because of a prohibited allocation of S corporation stock under an ESOP (also, there will generally be adverse tax consequences if you roll over a distribution of S corporation stock to an IRA) The Plan administrator or the payor can tell you what portion of a payment is eligible for rollover. If I don’t do a rollover, will I have to pay the 10% additional income tax on early distributions? If you are under age 59, you will have to pay the 10% additional income tax on early distributions for any payment from the Plan (including amounts withheld for income tax) that you do not roll over, unless one of the exceptions listed below applies. If your distribution is from a designated Roth account and your payment is not a qualified distribution, the additional 10% tax will apply only to the earnings allocated to the payment that you do not roll over, unless one of the exceptions listed below applies. This tax is in addition to the regular income tax on the payment not rolled over. The 10% additional income tax does not apply to the following payments from the Plan:

• Payments made after you separate from service, if you will be at least age 55 in the year of the separation

• Payments that start after you separate from service, if paid at least annually in equal or close to equal amounts over your life or life expectancy (or the lives or joint life expectancy of you and your beneficiary)

• Payments made due to disability

• Payments after your death

• Payments of ESOP dividends

• Corrective distributions of contributions that exceed tax law limitations

• Payments made directly to the government to satisfy a federal tax levy

• Payments made under a qualified domestic relations order (QDRO)

• Payments up to the amount of your deductible medical expenses

• Certain payments made while you are on active duty, if you were a member of a reserve component called to duty after September 11, 2001, for more than 179 days

• Payments of certain automatic enrollment contributions requested to be withdrawn within 90 days of the first contribution

If I do a rollover to an IRA or Roth IRA, will the 10% additional income tax apply to early distributions from the IRA or Roth IRA?

If you receive a payment from an IRA (or Roth IRA) when you are under age 59, you will have to pay the 10% additional income tax on early distributions from the IRA, unless an exception applies. In the case of a distribution from a Roth IRA, only the earnings will be subject to this 10% additional income tax. In general, the exceptions to the 10% additional income tax for early distributions from an IRA or Roth IRA are the same as the exceptions listed above for early distributions from a plan. However, there are a few differences for payments from either an IRA or Roth IRA, including:

• There is no exception for payments after separation from service that are made after age 55.

• The exception for QDROs does not apply (although a special rule applies under which, as part of a divorce or separation agreement, a tax-free transfer may be made directly to an IRA of a spouse or former spouse).

• The exception for payments made at least annually, in equal or close to equal amounts, over a specified period applies without regard to whether you have had a separation from service.

• There are additional exceptions for (1) payments for qualified higher education expenses, (2) payments up to

$10,000 used in a qualified first-time home purchase and (3) payments after you have received unemployment compensation for 12 consecutive weeks (or would have been eligible to receive unemployment compensation but for self-employed status).

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Will I owe state income taxes?

This notice does not describe any state or local income tax rules (including withholding rules). SPECIAL RULES AND OPTIONS

If your payment includes after-tax contributions (not including a payment from a designated Roth account)

There are special rules that apply to distributions of after-tax contributions that are different from the rules applicable to distributions of after-tax amounts held in a designated Roth account. After-tax contributions that are included in a payment

(and that are not from a designated Roth account) are not taxed. If a payment is only part of your benefit, an allocable portion of your after-tax contributions is generally included in the payment, so you cannot take a payment of only after-tax contributions. If you have pre-1987 after-tax contributions maintained in a separate account, a special rule may apply to determine whether the after-tax contributions are included in a payment. In addition, special rules apply when you do a rollover, as described below.

You may roll over to an IRA a payment that includes after-tax contributions through either a direct rollover or a 60-day rollover. You must keep track of the aggregate amount of the after-tax contributions in all of your IRAs (in order to determine your taxable income for later payments from the IRAs). If you do a direct rollover of only a portion of the amount paid from the Plan and at the same time the rest is paid to you, the portion directly rolled over consists first of the amount that would be taxable if not rolled over. For example, assume you are receiving a distribution of $12,000, of which $2,000 is after-tax contributions. In this case, if you directly roll over $10,000 to an IRA that is not a Roth IRA, no amount is taxable because the $2,000 amount not directly rolled over is treated as being after-tax contributions. If you do a direct rollover of the entire amount paid from the Plan to two or more destinations at the same time, you can choose which destination receives the after-tax contributions.

If you do a 60-day rollover to an IRA of only a portion of a payment made to you, the after-tax contributions are treated as rolled over last. For example, assume you are receiving a distribution of $12,000, of which $2,000 is after-tax contributions, and no part of the distribution is directly rolled over. In this case, if you roll over $10,000 to an IRA that is not a Roth IRA in a 60-day rollover, no amount is taxable because the $2,000 amount not rolled over is treated as being after-tax contributions. You may roll over to an employer plan all of a payment that includes after-tax contributions, but only through a direct rollover (and only if the receiving plan separately accounts for after-tax contributions and is not a governmental section 457(b) plan). You can do a 60-day rollover to



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