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Engineer Machine Operator

Location:
Wylie, Texas, United States
Salary:
12.00
Posted:
February 22, 2018

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Harry E. Sanderson ac4kso@r.postjobfree.com

520-***-**** C 2824 Sun Crest Drive

Citizenship: US Sierra Vista, AZ 85650

Veterans Preference: 10% SCD, VRA, VEOA, Schedule A

Objective: DECA-17-1873024-MP, Store Associate, GS-1101-04/04.

Work Experience

Locomotive Engineer 05/1993 – 02/2003

BNSF Railroad S: James Danco

3700 Globeville Road P: 303-***-**** May contact

Denver, Co 80216 40 hrs. /w, $50,000.00/yr.

Interpret train orders, signals, or railroad rules and regulations that govern the operation of locomotives. Confer with conductors or traffic control center personnel via radiophones to issue or receive information concerning stops, delays, or oncoming trains. Receive starting signals from conductors and use controls such as throttles or air brakes to drive electric, diesel-electric, or electric locomotives. Monitor gauges or meters that measure speed, amperage, battery charge, or air pressure in brake lines or in main reservoirs. Observe tracks to detect obstructions. Call out train signals to assistants to verify meanings. Operate locomotives to transport freight between stations or to assemble or disassemble trains within rail yards. Respond to emergency conditions or breakdowns, following applicable safety procedures and rules. Inspect locomotives to verify adequate fuel, sand, water, or other supplies before each run or to check for mechanical problems. Inspect locomotives after runs to detect damaged or defective equipment. Prepare reports regarding any problems encountered, such as accidents, signaling problems, unscheduled stops, or delays. Check to ensure that documentation, such as procedure manuals or logbooks, are in the driver's cab and available for staff use. Monitor train loading procedures to ensure that freight or rolling stock are loaded or unloaded without damage.

Owner 05/1990 – 07/1993

Sanderson Welding S: Harry E. Sanderson

4532 Lake Meade Drive P: 520-***-**** May contact

Greenlee, CO 80634 40 hrs. /w, $5,000.00/yr.

Inspect, measure, or test completed metal workpieces to ensure conformance to specifications, using measuring and testing devices. Read blueprints, work orders, or production schedules to determine product or job instructions or specifications. Assemble, align, and clamp workpieces into holding fixtures to bond, heat-treat, or solder fabricated metal components. Set up, operate, or tend welding machines that join or bond components to fabricate metal products or assemblies. Lay out, fit, or connect parts to be bonded, calculating production measurements as necessary. Correct problems by adjusting controls or by stopping machines and opening holding devices. Give directions to other workers regarding machine set-up and use. Select, position, align, and bolt jigs, holding fixtures, guides, or stops onto machines, using measuring instruments and hand tools. Mark weld points and positions of components on workpieces, using rules, squares, templates, or scribes. Transfer components, metal products, or assemblies, using moving equipment. Prepare metal surfaces or workpieces, using hand-operated equipment, such as grinders, cutters, or drills. Clean, lubricate, maintain, and adjust equipment to maintain efficient operation, using air hoses, cleaning fluids, and hand tools. Conduct trial runs before welding, soldering, or brazing and make necessary adjustments to equipment. Remove completed workpieces or parts from machinery, using hand tools. Tend auxiliary equipment used in welding processes.

Load or feed workpieces into welding machines to join or bond components. Observe meters, gauges, or machine operations to ensure that soldering or brazing processes meet specifications. Turn and press knobs and buttons or enter operating instructions to adjust and start welding machines. Compute and record settings for new work, applying knowledge of metal properties, principles of welding, and shop mathematics. Set dials and timing controls to regulate electrical current, gas flow pressure, heating or cooling cycles, or shut-off. Record operational information on specified production reports. Select torch tips, alloys, flux, core, tubing, or wire, according to metal types or thicknesses, data charts, or records. Fill hoppers and position spouts to direct flow of flux or manually brush flux onto seams of workpieces. Start, monitor, and adjust robotic welding production lines. Devise or build fixtures or jigs used to hold parts in place during welding, brazing, or soldering. Add chemicals or materials to workpieces or machines to facilitate bonding or to cool workpieces. Immerse completed workpieces into water or oil baths to cool and clean components. Dress electrodes, using tip dressers, files, emery cloths, or dressing wheels. Anneal finished workpieces to relieve internal stress.

Locomotive Engineer 03/1974 – 07/1990

Union Pacific Railroad S: Fred Emmons

1033 W. 48th Ave P: 303-***-**** May contact

Denver, CO 80221 40 hrs. /w, $49,000.00/yr.

Interpret train orders, signals, or railroad rules and regulations that govern the operation of locomotives. Confer with conductors or traffic control center personnel via radiophones to issue or receive information concerning stops, delays, or oncoming trains. Receive starting signals from conductors and use controls such as throttles or air brakes to drive electric, diesel-electric, or electric locomotives. Monitor gauges or meters that measure speed, amperage, battery charge, or air pressure in brake lines or in main reservoirs. Observe tracks to detect obstructions. Call out train signals to assistants to verify meanings. Operate locomotives to transport freight between stations or to assemble or disassemble trains within rail yards. Respond to emergency conditions or breakdowns, following applicable safety procedures and rules. Inspect locomotives to verify adequate fuel, sand, water, or other supplies before each run or to check for mechanical problems. Inspect locomotives after runs to detect damaged or defective equipment. Prepare reports regarding any problems encountered, such as accidents, signaling problems, unscheduled stops, or delays. Check to ensure that documentation, such as procedure manuals or logbooks, are in the driver's cab and available for staff use. Monitor train loading procedures to ensure that freight or rolling stock are loaded or unloaded without damage.

Machine Operator 04/1972 – 11/1974

U.S. Naval Shipyard S: Human Resources

1245 7th Street P: 202-***-**** May contact

Bremerton, WA 98337 40 hrs. /w, $18,720.00/yr.

Adjust machine controls and change tool settings to keep dimensions within specified tolerances. Replace worn tools, and sharpen dull cutting tools and dies using bench grinders or cutter-grinding machines. Inspect sample workpieces to verify conformance with specifications, using instruments such as gauges, micrometers, and dial indicators. Start lathe or turning machines and observe operations to ensure that specifications are met. Position, secure, and align cutting tools in tool holders on machines, using hand tools, and verify their positions with measuring instruments.

Crank machines through cycles, stopping to adjust tool positions and machine controls to ensure specified timing, clearances, and tolerances. Study blueprints, layouts or charts, and job orders for information on specifications and tooling instructions, and to determine material requirements and operational sequences. Move controls to set cutting speeds and depths and feed rates, and to position tools in relation to workpieces. Select cutting tools and tooling instructions, according to written specifications or knowledge of metal properties and shop mathematics. Install holding fixtures, cams, gears, and stops to control stock and tool movement, using hand tools, power tools, and measuring instruments. Refill, change, and monitor the level of fluids, such as oil and coolant, in machines. Compute unspecified dimensions and machine settings, using knowledge of metal properties and shop mathematics. Lift metal stock or workpieces manually or using hoists, and position and secure them in machines, using fasteners and hand tools. Move tool holders manually or by turning hand wheels, or engage automatic feeding mechanisms to feed tools to and along workpieces. Turn valve handles to direct the flow of coolant onto work areas or spinning compounds. Mount attachments, such as relieving or tracing attachments, to perform operations such as duplicating contours of templates or trimming workpieces.

Motor Pool 04/1956 – 07/1958

U.S. Marine Corps S: Admin Office

20250 Vandegrift Blvd Camp Pendleton P: 760-***-**** May contact

Oceanside, CA 92055 40 hrs. /w, $1,104.00/yr.

As part of the Marine Corps Motor Transport Operator specialty that is involved in the transportation of personnel and supplies in military convoys, and movement of goods and materials throughout the military battlefield and support operations. Experienced with safety procedures, International road signs and rules of the road, basic vehicle maintenance, and accident prevention. Serving in the Marine Corps as a Motor Transport Specialist and dealing with Marine Corps personnel of all different rank and ratings. Experienced and licensed with operating a Six by Six Heavy Equipment. Spend time in the field in combat simulation training, and part of the time in the classroom. Learned how to operate in a convoy and be part of team working to deliver and provide for the Marine Corps mission at home and abroad. Responsible for monitoring and checking vehicle fluid levels, such as fuel, oil and tire pressures, and performing routine repairs. Responsible for driving and operating different types of vehicles from heavy troop transports, passenger buses transporting Marines. Operators are responsible to operate various wheeled vehicles to transport cargo, personnel and supplies. Some responsibilities as a motor transport operator will include: keeping detailed vehicle records, reading load plans, driving vehicles over all different types of terrains and roads, as part of convoys and combat operations.

Education

Phoenix School of Welding, completed, received certification 1971

Locomotive Engineering College, completed, received certification 1978

Locomotive Engineering College, completed, received certification 1998

Springfield High School, graduated, received diploma/GED 1959

Other Information

Analyzed engineering drawings, blueprints, specifications, sketches and work orders Developed templates and models for welding projects using mathematical calculations. Reliable, polite and courteous, excellent eyesight, basic computer literate with the Internet and email.



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